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Old School Virus Called KBOT Is Hitting Networks

Old School Virus Called KBOT Is Hitting Networks

There was a day when worms were once common, terrifying threats on the internet. In the early days of the world wide web, there were a number of famous attacks that were considered highly advanced for their time. Time and technology have moved on of course, and these days, modern malware is significantly more advanced. Except for KBOT. KBOT is a blast from the past. Recently discovered by Kaspersky researchers, KBOT has been dubbed “the first living virus in recent years that we have spotted in the wild.” They describe the virus as follows: “KBOT poses a serious threat because it is able to spread quickly in the system and on the local network by infecting executable files with no possibility of recovery. It significantly slows down the system through injects into system process, enables its handlers to control the compromised system through remote desktop sessions, steals personal data, and performs web injects for the purpose of stealing users’ bank data.” As you can see from this brief description, this piece of malware might be old school, but it’s a serious threat. By destroying the files it infects, it’s not just a matter of getting rid of the infection. Invariably, you’ll have to reinstall all the infected code on the PC. In addition to being a highly destructive virus, it’s also designed to steal vast quantities of data. Then it makes a priority of connecting to its command and control server once it establishes a hold so it can send back any data it’s been coded to target. If it’s not already on your radar, it certainly deserves paying...
Malware And Viruses On Apple/Mac Systems Are On The Rise

Malware And Viruses On Apple/Mac Systems Are On The Rise

For most of Apple’s history, the company has been able to cast itself as a safer alternative to Windows-based computers.Hackers tended to focus the bulk of their efforts on Wintel boxes (Windows processors), rather than Apple machines. That has been changing in recent months. According to research conducted by Malwarebytes, over the past twelve months, there has been a significant upsurge in the number of attacks made against Macs. To give you a sense of the scope and scale of the increase, in prior years, the average number of detections per Mac clocked in at 4.8, while the number of detections per Windows-based PC was 5.8. In 2019, the average number of detections per Windows-based PC remained unchanged, while the average number of detections per Mac spiked to 11, more than doubling in a single year. The researchers note, however, that the types of threats Mac users face are very different from the threats presented against Windows-based PCs, and are generally not dangerous. For instance, the most common infections Mac users suffer from are adware programs that display unwanted ads to infected recipients. Naturally, there are cases of ransomware, keyloggers and banking trojans that target Macs. However, they are relatively less common than similar infections on Windows-based PCs. If you’re a Mac user, don’t breathe a sigh of relief just yet though. The Malwarebytes research team concludes by warning us. They say although the attacks against Macs are currently less destructive than the attacks made against Windows-based PCs, that could change at any moment. There’s nothing whatsoever keeping the hackers from swapping out adware in preference for a much...
Windows 10X Will Assist With Folding Screens And Dual Monitors

Windows 10X Will Assist With Folding Screens And Dual Monitors

A lot of people raise a curious eyebrow when they hear the term Windows 10X for the first time. It’s a bit of a niche product, but it is interesting. In recent years, several smartphone manufacturers have announced that they’d be experimenting with models sporting larger screens. For example, folding smartphones that when unfolded give you much more screen real estate than any of the phones currently available. It sounds great in theory, but the early models we’ve seen have been decidedly underwhelming. Microsoft is hoping to change that by offering a scaled down version of Windows that will make it possible for foldable smartphones and dual monitor users to get more mileage out of their equipment. If this sounds at least vaguely familiar, you’re not imagining. Although Microsoft pulled out of the smartphone OS market, they have made several forays into that segment, including Windows CE. Windows 10X is evidence that the company hasn’t given up completely on the idea of Windows on a smartphone. Whether it will succeed or not is anyone’s guess. At a recent trade show, the company said that they were planning an initial Holiday 2020 release of the slimmed down OS. The company’s statement reads in part, as follows: “Your code is important, and our goal is to make going on this journey with us as easy as possible. This starts by maintaining app compatibility and ensuring your existing websites and apps work well on dual-screen devices. Windows 10X is an expression of Windows 10 and for the first time, apps will run in containers to deliver non-intrusive updates and improved system resources...
Dangerous New Trojan Can Infect Systems Through Wifi

Dangerous New Trojan Can Infect Systems Through Wifi

If you’re not already familiar with the Emotet trojan, it deserves a special spot on your radar. It’s one of the most dangerous forms of malware in the world today. Their success is thanks to the fact that its creators have worked hard and diligently to keep it upgraded by bolting on a variety of modules that enhance its capabilities in new, and sometimes terrifying ways. Recently, researchers at BinaryDefense have spotted a particularly nasty new module that allows the trojan to infect other devices nearby. Called a “WiFi Spreader,” it allows the trojan to hop wirelessly from one device to another. Granted, this capability does not guarantee a 100 percent infection success rate, because the nearby device may have protection protocols in place. It does, however, provide a new attack vector the malware can utilize to spread itself farther than it otherwise might. The implications of this are staggering. If Emotet makes its way onto your system and the strain you have has the WiFi Spreader module, it poses many risks. It poses risks to your own network, to the personal devices your employees carry that aren’t connected to your network, and also to any other networks in close proximity to yours. Whether the networks are one floor up, or down, right next door, they are also at risk. Also, consider the implications of an Emotet infection in a shared work environment. For example, WeWork office space, or a constellation of small companies that share one floor of an office and work in close proximity to one another. These kinds of arrangements are increasingly common and will absolutely...
CoronaVirus Scare Is Being Used By Scammers To Trick People

CoronaVirus Scare Is Being Used By Scammers To Trick People

There is no low that hackers and scammers won’t stoop to. The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued a warning about a worldwide scam in progress relating to fears surrounding the CoronaVirus. The FTC’s announcement speaks for itself. Their announcement reads, in part: “Scammers are taking advantage of fears surrounding the Coronavirus. They’re setting up websites to sell bogus products, and using fake emails, texts and social media posts as a ruse to take your money and get your personal information. The emails and posts may be promoting awareness and prevention tips, and fake information about cases in your neighborhood. They also may be asking you to donate to victims, offering advice on unproven treatments, or contain malicious email attachments.” Even worse, it appears that there are multiple campaigns like this, running in tandem. Francis Gaffney is the Director of Threat Intelligence for Minecast, which is one of several companies tracking the issue. Francis added this: “The sole intention of these threat actors is to play on the public’s genuine fear to increase the likelihood of users clicking on an attachment or link delivered in a malicious communication to cause infection, or for monetary gain.” In short, this is about as despicable as it gets. Then again, hackers and scammers have been known to send emails targeting children, so it shouldn’t come as a great surprise. Even so, the standard precautions apply here. Unless you know and trust the sender of a communication, even if it’s about something scary and important like the CoronaVirus, don’t click on links or open attachments. You never know where it might take...