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Racoon Stealer Malware Is New One To Watch For

Racoon Stealer Malware Is New One To Watch For

There is a new form of malware that you and your staff need to be aware of. That’s because it’s gaining in popularity among cyber criminals around the world.  Known as ‘Racoon Stealer,’ it is noteworthy not for its complexity but rather, for its extreme ease of use.  Worse, the malware’s designers have been marketing it aggressively both inside and out of the Dark Web, which is driving rampant adoption rates. Racoon Stealer was first spotted in the wild in April of 2019.  It’s a Trojan virus that’s relatively simple in its construction, but quite adept at collecting password information and sending it back to whomever launched it. The Senior Director of Threat Hunting at Cybereason, Assaf Dahan, had this to say about the emerging threat: “Raccoon, like other information stealers, poses significant risks to individuals and organizations alike.  Any malware that is designed to steal passwords and personal information from browsers and mail clients could potentially inflict great damage to its victims. The stolen data is being sold to the highest bidder in the underground community and can be used in many ways–from identity theft, financial theft or even as an entry vector to penetrate an organization and in order to carry out a larger attack.” In addition to the general hype created by the marketing campaign, the group behind Raccoon provides its criminal user base with more tools. These include an easy-to-use backend, hosting, and dedicated ’round the clock support, all for $200 a month.  The data that this little piece of code can obtain can easily generate high amounts of income for the hacker. That makes...
Popular Web Domain Registrar Hit With Data Breach

Popular Web Domain Registrar Hit With Data Breach

Do you have web domains registered with Web.com, Network Solutions or Register.com? If so, at least some of your data may have been compromised. Web.com recently reported that they and their two subsidiaries named above were breached by an unknown third party. The breach occurred in late August 2019 and the company discovered evidence of the intrusion on October 16th, 2019. They opted not to disclose the details until now. At present, the company is working with third-party forensic investigators and law enforcement. Investigators do not yet have a clear idea of precisely how many customer records were compromised, though the language used to describe the scope and scale of the breach is “limited.” Based on what investigators know so far, the data that was compromised included: Email addresses Phone numbers Physical Addresses Customer Names Information about the services that have been offered to customers The company stresses that no password or credit card information was compromised. As to next steps, the company is in the process of contacting all impacted customers. As a precaution, if you do business with any of the three companies mentioned at the start, you should probably change your password right away. Also, be sure you’re not using the same password at Web.com, Network Solutions or Register.com that you’re using anywhere else on the web. With so many high-profile incidents like these in the headlines, such advice shouldn’t have to be given. Yet, the latest surveys show that a shocking percentage of users still rely on the same password to give them access to multiple web properties, which is a recipe for disaster.  If...
Non-Updated Android Phones Vulnerable To NFC Beaming Hacks

Non-Updated Android Phones Vulnerable To NFC Beaming Hacks

Has it been more than a month since you upgraded your Android OS? If so, you should make upgrading a priority. Just over a month ago, Google patched a critical flaw in the Android OS that allowed hackers to “beam” malware to any unpatched devices via a process called ‘NFC Beaming’. It relies on a service called Android Beam that allows an Android device to send videos, apps, images, or other files to a nearby device using Near-Field Communication (NFC) radio waves as an alternative to Bluetooth or WiFi.  It’s a great technology and a handy capability but sadly, its implementation was flawed. Fortunately, the flaw was unearthed by an independent security researcher who alerted Google to the problem.  Even worse, when files are sent in this manner, the user would not get a prompt warning them that an app was attempting to be installed from an “unknown source.” If there’s a silver lining in all of this, it is the fact that NFC connections are only initiated when two devices are sitting close to each other. By ‘close’ we mean really close.  The range is limited to 4 centimeters (about an inch and a half).  This limits the attack vector’s utility quite sharply. Even so, it’s something to be aware of, especially if you travel frequently. It’s well worth grabbing Google’s latest update for Android Oreo if you haven’t already done so.  The alternative to this course of action is to go into your Android settings and disable Android Beam and NFC if it’s a feature you seldom use anyway. Kudos to the sharp-eyed researcher who caught the...
Google Chrome Users Should Update Immediately

Google Chrome Users Should Update Immediately

If you’re using Google’s Chrome browser to read this article, be advised that the company has announced the presence of a pair of major, Zero-Day vulnerabilities that put you at immediate risk. Not only are the flaws of the highest possible severity, but hackers have already begun exploiting them. The two issues are being tracked as CVE-2019-13720 and CVE-2019-13721. The first of these impacts Chrome’s audio component, while the second resides in the PDFium library.  The company has been reluctant to release any technical details on these issues for fear that it will lead to even more widespread exploitation. Part of the official statement from Google on the matter reads as follows: “Google is aware of reports that an exploit for CVE-2019-13720 exists in the wild…Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix.  We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on but haven’t yet fixed.” The issues were discovered and reported by researchers from Kaspersky Labs and Google immediately took steps to patch the problem. Google is urging all Chrome users to update to version 78.0.3904.87 immediately.  If you’re not sure what version of the browser you’re running, you can check by clicking the three vertical dots in the upper right corner, going to “Help” and then “About,” which will tell you if your browser is updated or manually trigger the update process. These issues are about as serious as they come.  Zero-day exploits are, as one might expect, exceedingly dangerous. Given that one of the...
Google Is Bringing Back Chrome’s Close Other Tabs Option

Google Is Bringing Back Chrome’s Close Other Tabs Option

Not long ago, Google decided to remove the “Close Other Tabs” option from the right click context menu of their browser. While its removal didn’t exactly cause an uproar among Chrome’s massive user base, the move was greeted with confusion and resignation. It was after all a good, handy feature. If you’ve been missing it, then you’ll be pleased to know that as of the release of Chrome 78, the feature is being returned.  Google didn’t explain why they decided to remove the feature in the first place, and they’ve offered no explanation as to why they suddenly decided to reinstate it. If you’re a power user in the habit of keeping dozens,or more tabs open, it’s good news indeed. Unfortunately, three other menu options were removed at the same time that “Close Other Tabs” was removed: “New Tab”, “Reopen Closed Tab”, and “Bookmark All Tabs”.  Sadly, there’s no evidence that either of these are coming back. Granted, these things can be accomplished via other means. However, having them on the shortcut menu made their operation fast, simple and convenient.  Even though the other three apparently aren’t coming back, we’re thrilled to hear that at least one of them will. Even without the rest, Google’s recent tweaks and changes to Chrome have all been exceptional. They should especially be proud of their password checkup extension and their eventual plans to roll that functionality into the browser itself.  It’s easy to see why Chrome is still the browser of choice for a solid majority of users. Say what you want about giant tech companies, but Google has a demonstrated track...
Employees Targeted By Hackers Posing As HR Department

Employees Targeted By Hackers Posing As HR Department

Just when you think scammers couldn’t get any lower, they find new ways to prove you wrong.  Recently, a new phishing scam has been spotted in the wild, this one baiting potential victims with the possibility of pay raises. The scammers structured their email so that they appeared to come from the Human Resources department of their victims’ companies. They asked the recipient of their phishing email to open an Excel spreadsheet bearing the name “salary-increase-sheet-November-2019.xls.”  A shortcut to the remotely hosted spreadsheet was naturally provided. The body of the email explained that “The Years Wage increase will start in November 2019 and will be paid out for the first time in December, with recalculation as of November.”  Needless to say, this tends to catch most people’s attention.  After all, who doesn’t want a raise, right? If a recipient clicked on the link, he or she would then be asked to provide Office 365 login credentials in order to see the file.  Of course, the file contains dummy data and has nothing to do with getting a raise; it’s simply a useful hook to get an unwitting user to hand over their credentials. The scammers not only constructed a convincing looking email, but the Office 365 login screen looks exactly like a legitimate login screen. This goes far in explaining the campaign’s unusually high success rate. The researchers who have been following the issue urge Office 365 users to enable multi-factor authentication via Office 365 or a third-party solution. They also encourage business owners to enroll their staff in phishing awareness training programs designed to help employees spot and...